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Candied Orange Peel

Candied Orange Peel

Glistening like the holiday lights with bright, sweet notes of citrus.

Candied citrus peel is a centuries old method of preserving every piece of the orange. Much like the art of making jam or marmalade was and still is used to preserve fresh fruit, processing the peel of citrus meant nothing went to waste.

The process of making the candied peel includes simply the orange peel and sugar, which has long been used as a natural preservative for fruits.

Thin slices of orange peel are blanched then cooked in a simple syrup solution, soaking up all that sweetness.

The tender peels are tossed in sugar then slowing baked to aid in drying the peels and set the candy. The candied peels air dry until the sugar coating is completely set.

Candied orange peels are wonderful as a candy but can also be used as a gorgeous topping for desserts. Beautiful sweet treats for any holiday get together!

Candied Orange Peel

2 large oranges, such as navel or Cara Cara

1-3/4 cups sugar, divided

½ cup water plus extra for boiling

Cut the orange peel from the orange, cutting it into fourths from top to bottom. Carefully remove the peel from the orange.

Cut each section of peel lengthwise into thin strips, about ¼” each.

Fill a saucepan with water and bring to a boil over medium heat. Add the orange peels and boil for 3 minutes.

Leave the water boiling and using a spider or slotted spoon transfer the peels to a colander and rinse with cold water. Return the orange peels to the boiling water and boil for an additional 3 minutes. Drain the pan with the peels into a colander.

Return the saucepan to the stove and add ½ cup water and ¾ cup of the sugar. Stir to combine then add the orange peels. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat.

Cook for 30 minutes until the orange peels have soaked up most of the sugar syrup, stirring frequently.

Place the remaining 1 cup of sugar in a large shallow bowl or pan. Using tongs drop the orange peels in small batches into the sugar. Toss the peels in the sugar to coat all sides.

Set the sugar coated orange peels in a single layer on a wire rack placed over a baking sheet. Bake the peels in a 250-degree oven for 20 minutes. Allow them to dry overnight or until the sugar coating is set.

Store in a sealed container. Makes about 1-1/2 cups.

Candied Orange Peel

December 17, 2018
: Makes about 1-1/2 cups of candied peels.

Candied Orange Peel - glistening like the holiday lights with bright, sweet notes of citrus.

By:

Ingredients
  • 2 large oranges, such as navel or Cara Cara
  • 1-3/4 cups sugar, divided
  • ½ cup water plus extra for boiling
Directions
  • Step 1 Cut the orange peel from the orange, cutting it into fourths from top to bottom. Carefully remove the peel from the orange.
  • Step 2 Cut each section of peel lengthwise into thin strips, about ¼” each.
  • Step 3 Fill a saucepan with water and bring to a boil over medium heat. Add the orange peels and boil for 3 minutes.
  • Step 4 Leave the water boiling and using a spider or slotted spoon transfer the peels to a colander and rinse with cold water. Return the orange peels to the boiling water and boil for an additional 3 minutes. Drain the pan with the peels into a colander.
  • Step 5 Return the saucepan to the stove and add ½ cup water and ¾ cup of the sugar. Stir to combine then add the orange peels. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat.
  • Step 6 Cook for 30 minutes until the orange peels have soaked up most of the sugar syrup, stirring frequently.
  • Step 7 Place the remaining 1 cup of sugar in a large shallow bowl or pan. Using tongs drop the orange peels in small batches into the sugar. Toss the peels in the sugar to coat all sides.
  • Step 8 Set the sugar coated orange peels in a single layer on a wire rack placed over a baking sheet.
  • Step 9 Bake the peels in a 250-degree oven for 20 minutes. Allow them to dry overnight or until the sugar coating is set.
  • Step 10 Store in a sealed container.


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