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Jalapeño Jelly

Jalapeño Jelly

Sweet jelly with a delightful kick of spicy heat and all the spectacular colors of the season.

Jalapeño jelly makes a great glaze when grilling or roasting chicken or pork and even is a bright substitute for mint jelly when serving lamb. But one of the most popular ways to serve jalapeño jelly is alongside cream cheese, smeared on a crisp cracker. It’s a lovely and tantalizing holiday appetizer!

I’ve started the process of making jams and jellies for holiday gift giving. This year I decided to pull out an old recipe for jalapeño jelly. The first time I ever made this unique jelly was the summer, when as a novelty I decided to plant jalapeño peppers in my garden. These little peppers are prolific. I had peppers by the dozens and one can only do so much with them. I gave them away, pickled them but still have dozens of peppers. So I decided to make jelly.

You can make jalapeño jelly using either green or red peppers. The only difference between the two is the age of the peppers. As peppers continue to ripen they will turn red and will sweeten slightly but still have that heat.

A quick tip or two when you’re working with hot peppers of any kind. It’s best to wear food service gloves when handling the peppers. If you don’t have gloves then thoroughly wash your hands after you’ve finished cutting and seeding the jalapeño peppers. The heat from the peppers is tucked away in the inner parts of the peppers primarily in the white part or pith of the pepper. It will be transferred to anything they touch – including your hands. And whatever you do, don’t rub your eyes if you’ve touched the peppers!

A wonderful gift for the holidays!

Jalapeño Jelly

Green jalapeño peppers are the most common but you can on occasion find red peppers. If you want to make a red jelly, use both red jalapeño and red bell peppers.

8 jalapeños peppers

1 large bell pepper

5 cups sugar

1-1/4 white or white wine vinegar

½ cup water

6 ounces liquid pectin, 1 box with two 3-ounce packages

Trim the stem end of the jalapeño pepper, then cut them in half and remove the pith and majority of the seeds, leaving only a small amount for a touch of heat. The seeds can transfer some of the heat from the pith. If you want the appearance of seeds in your jelly but with minimal heat you can add some seeds from the bell pepper.

Process the peppers in a food processor until they are finely chopped, about 10 to 15 seconds. You should have ¾ cup to 1 cup of chopped jalapeño peppers.

Remove the stem and trim the bell pepper, cut into pieces and process until finely chopped, about 10 to 15 seconds. You’ll have about ¾ cup to 1 cup of chopped bell peppers.

Transfer the chopped peppers to a large kettle or stockpot.

Add the sugar, the vinegar and the water and stir to combine.

Cook over low heat until the sugar is dissolved, stirring occasionally – about 30 minutes.

Raise the heat to medium and bring the jelly to a boil. Boil for 5 minutes then remove the kettle from the heat and let the jelly set for 20 minutes.

Stir in the liquid pectin into the jelly then return to medium heat. Bring the jelly back to a boil and boil for 1 minute.

Ladle the jelly into sterilized jars.

You can keep the jam refrigerated or process the jars in a water bath following the jar manufacturers directions. Ball makes wonderful canning jars and they have great step-by-step guidelines to canning safely on their website.

Makes about 6 half-pint jars plus 1 quarter-pint jar.

Jalapeño Jelly, courtesy of Preserving Good Stock

December 5, 2018
: Makes 6 half-pint jars plus one quarter-pint jar.

Sweet jelly with a delightful kick of spicy heat. Jalapeño pepper jelly makes a great glaze when grilling or roasting chicken or pork and even is a bright substitute for mint jelly when serving lamb. But one of the most popular ways to serve jalapeño jelly is alongside cream cheese, smeared on a crisp cracker.

By:

Ingredients
  • 8 jalapeños peppers
  • 1 large bell pepper
  • 5 cups sugar
  • 1-1/4 white or white wine vinegar
  • ½ cup water
  • 6 ounces liquid pectin, 1 box with two 3-ounce packages
Directions
  • Step 1 Trim the stem end of the jalapeño pepper, then cut them in half and remove the pith and majority of the seeds, leaving only a small amount for a touch of heat. The seeds can transfer some of the heat from the pith. If you want the appearance of seeds in your jelly but with minimal heat you can add some seeds from the bell pepper.
  • Step 2 Process the peppers in a food processor until they are finely chopped, about 10 to 15 seconds. You should have ¾ cup to 1 cup of chopped jalapeño peppers.
  • Step 3 Remove the stem and trim the bell pepper, cut into pieces and process until finely chopped, about 10 to 15 seconds. You’ll have about ¾ cup to 1 cup of chopped bell peppers.
  • Step 4 Transfer the chopped peppers to a large kettle or stockpot.
  • Step 5 Add the sugar, the vinegar and the water and stir to combine. Cook over low heat until the sugar is dissolved, stirring occasionally – about 30 minutes.
  • Step 6 Raise the heat to medium and bring the jelly to a boil. Boil for 5 minutes then remove the kettle from the heat and let the jelly set for 20 minutes.
  • Step 7 Stir in the liquid pectin into the jelly then return to medium heat. Bring the jelly back to a boil and boil for 1 minute.
  • Step 8 Ladle the jelly into sterilized jars and keep the jam refrigerated or process the jars in a water bath following the jar manufacturers directions.
  • Step 9 Ball makes wonderful canning jars and they have great step-by-step guidelines to canning safely on their website.


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