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Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

This classic cookie doesn’t often get the respect it deserves. When done right, it’s a bite of goodness that’s slightly chewy with a crisp edge and a gentle warmth of ground cinnamon.

For all the years that Emily was in school I was a working Mom. So doing something special to slide into her lunchbox was my way of letting her know I was thinking of her throughout the day. Many weekends we spent baking cookies and this is one of the recipes that made the rounds numerous times.

These vintage cookies are loaded with oats, sweetened with both granulated and dark brown sugars and luscious plump, golden raisins. Pops of flavor from pure vanilla extract and a heaping amount of spice from cinnamon push these oatmeal cookies into the category of irresistible!

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies are fast and so easy to make. This recipe makes dozens of cookies, enough to satisfy a hungry crew. The dough will keep in the fridge for about 5 days so you can spread the baking time out or you can flash-freeze them. Either way you can have them on hand for any cookie emergency!

Use old-fashioned oats, not instant or steel cut oats. The texture of old-fashioned oats will blend perfectly into the dough leaving behind a nutty quality. And the raisins are certainly optional, but before you leave them out give them a try. I use golden raisins instead of the darker, more common raisins.

They all but disappear in the cookies adding a subtle chewiness and a delightful note of flavor – it’s really worth tossing them into the mix!

Whip up a batch for your favorite kid – no matter how old they are!

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

2 cups flour

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

1 cup dark brown sugar, packed for measuring

1 cup sugar

2 extra-large eggs

2 tablespoons water

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

1 cup vegetable shortening

3 cups uncooked rolled oats – not instant

1 cup golden raisins

Whisk the flour together with the kosher salt, baking powder, baking soda and cinnamon.

In a large mixing bowl, blend the sugars together then add the flour mixture and combine until well mixed about 1 minute. Add the eggs, water vanilla extract and shortening.

Beat on medium speed until the dough is smooth, about 1 to 2 minutes.

Using low speed, stir in the oats and the raisins and beat for about 1 minute or just until the oats and raisins are mixed into the dough.

Using a small ice cream scoop or teaspoon, measure out rounds of dough onto a Silpat or parchment lined baking sheet, leaving about 2” between cookies. Use a larger scoop if you want a bigger cookie.

Bake in a 350-degree oven for 12 to 13 minutes, just until the dough no longer looks wet and the edges start to turn golden.

Let the cookies cool on the baking sheet for about 5 minutes until they’re cool enough to handle, then transfer them to a wire rack to finish cooling.

For a crispier cookie, bake an additional 2 to 3 minutes and for a thicker, softer cookie chill the dough balls for about 15 minutes before baking. To freeze cookie dough, scoop the dough into rounds and place them on a rimmed baking sheet. Freeze until firm, about 2 hours. Then bag the frozen cookie dough balls until ready to bake. No need to thaw before baking.

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies, courtesy of Preserving Good Stock

September 10, 2018
: 4 to 5 dozen cookies

This classic cookie doesn’t often get the respect it deserves. When done right, it’s a bite of goodness that’s slightly chewy with a crisp edge and a gentle warmth of ground cinnamon.

By:

Ingredients
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 cup dark brown sugar, packed for measuring
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 extra-large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup vegetable shortening
  • 3 cups uncooked rolled oats – not instant
  • 1 cup golden raisins
Directions
  • Step 1 Whisk the flour together with the kosher salt, baking powder, baking soda and cinnamon.
  • Step 2 In a large mixing bowl, blend the sugars together then add the flour mixture and combine until well mixed about 1 minute.
  • Step 3 Add the eggs, water vanilla extract and shortening and beat on medium speed until the dough is smooth, about 1 to 2 minutes.
  • Step 4 Using low speed, stir in the oats and the raisins and beat for about 1 minute or just until the oats and raisins are mixed into the dough.
  • Step 5 Using a small ice cream scoop or teaspoon, measure out rounds of dough onto a Silpat or parchment lined baking sheet, leaving about 2” between cookies. Use a larger scoop if you want a bigger cookie.
  • Step 6 Bake in a 350-degree oven for 12 to 13 minutes, just until the dough no longer looks wet and the edges start to turn golden.
  • Step 7 Let the cookies cool on the baking sheet for about 5 minutes until they’re cool enough to handle, then transfer them to a wire rack to finish cooling.
  • Step 8 For a crispier cookie, bake an additional 2 to 3 minutes and for a thicker, softer cookie chill the dough balls for about 15 minutes before baking.
  • Step 9 To freeze cookie dough, scoop the dough into rounds and place them on a rimmed baking sheet. Freeze until firm, about 2 hours. Then bag the frozen cookie dough balls until ready to bake. No need to thaw before baking.


2 thoughts on “Oatmeal Raisin Cookies”

    • You can but the texture of the cookies will be slightly different. Some cookies with all butter tend to be thinner and more crisp. Here’s a couple of tips. Start with the butter at room temperature then make sure to cream it with the sugar until the mixture is light and fluffy, about 4 minutes. You can also form the cookies then chill the rounds of dough for at least 15 minutes. (We do this frequently when making chocolate chip cookies – they’re made with all butter.) Baking the dough cold will help the cookies hold their shape a bit better.
      Hope this helps!

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