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Slow Roasted Beef Tenderloin

Slow Roasted Beef Tenderloin

We’re beef people, grew up with beef people and for many, many years our family raised our own. It’s hard to beat a good beef tenderloin, but if you’ve never cooked one it can seem daunting. When you look at the price per pound there is a lot of pressure not to mess it up!

I typically roast a beef tenderloin at 350 degrees, seasoned with nothing but olive oil, kosher salt, and fresh cracked black pepper, always with consistent results. Once I tried a recipe which required roasting the tenderloin at high heat of 500 degrees. Unfortunately one of our smoke alarms is located very close to the ovens. The minute the oven door was opened, heat and smoke rushed out, smoke alarm screeching in the background. All the while I assured my guests I knew this would happen, not to worry… “More wine?” I offered! (It’s an old trick. Never let your guests know something unexpected has occurred and never let them see you rattled.) The beef tenderloin was wonderful and no one really noticed the chaos in the background.

Not to be deterred, I was still open to try new methods to cook beef tenderloin. I’d had my eye on this recipe since I first purchased “Ina Garten’s Barefoot Contessa Foolproof” cookbook. Slow Roasted Filet of Beef with Basil Parmesan Mayonnaise. I had guests coming for dinner, beef tenderloin in my refrigerator and a ton of fresh basil growing on my patio. Seemed like the perfect time to give this a shot.

I always start with a whole beef tenderloin, not one that has been trimmed. If you have guests who like their meat well done, don’t tie up the small end of the tenderloin. (Personally, I would never dream of eating a gorgeous beef tenderloin cooked well done. But everyone has shortcomings so we try to be tolerant, accepting and accommodating!) A whole tenderloin should serve 6-8 people and leave some leftover for an amazing roast beef sandwich or two!

The basic ingredients are the same that I normally use to cook beef tenderloin with the addition of tarragon. Tarragon adds a very subtle, bittersweet note to the meat. Serve the beef with Basil Mayonnaise with Parmesan cheese to provide an elegant touch to this dish. (The recipe for Basil Mayonnaise is also posted in our blog.)

Slow Roasted Beef Tenderloin

Whole beef tenderloin, about 4-5 pounds

3-4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus 1 tablespoon to brush over the tarragon

4 teaspoons kosher salt

2-3 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper, preferably with a mortar and pestle so that the pepper is quite coarse

Fresh tarragon, about 8-10 large sprigs

About an hour before cooking, remove the beef tenderloin from the refrigerator and place in a large roasting pan which has been lightly coated with a cooking spray. Using paper towels, pat the tenderloin dry. Spread the olive oil over the entire tenderloin using your hands or a pastry brush. Cover all sides of the tenderloin with the kosher salt and black pepper, pressing gently into the meat. Tuck the “tail” (the thinner end of the tenderloin) under so that the meat is more uniform in size, allowing the meat to cook more evenly. Lay the springs of tarragon across the top of the tenderloin. Using cooking twine, tie the tenderloin in about 4-5 places, securing tarragon as you go. Brush the top of the tarragon sprigs with remaining olive oil.

Let the meat stand at room temperature at least 30 minutes, but no more than an hour. Preheat the oven to 275 degrees. Before placing the meat in the oven, insert a meat thermometer into the thickest part of the tenderloin. Roast for about 1-1/2 hours, or until the thermometer reaches 135 degrees for medium rare.

Insert a meat thermometer horizontally into the thickest part of the meat.

Remove the tenderloin from the oven, cover with foil and let the meat rest about 20 minutes before carving. (Don’t skip the rest time… This allows the beef juices to settle back into the meat and keeps the meat moist.)

Carve into preferred thickness and serve with the basil mayonnaise or a creamy horseradish sauce if desired.

Slow Roasted Beef Tenderloin

June 28, 2017
: Serves 8 to 10.

It’s hard to beat a good beef tenderloin, but if you’ve never cooked one it can seem daunting. When you look at the price per pound there is a lot of pressure no to mess it up! This is an easy and delicious way to cook a beef tenderloin!

By:

Ingredients
  • Whole beef tenderloin, about 4-5 pounds
  • 3-4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, 1 tablespoon to brush over the tarragon
  • 4 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2-3 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper
  • Fresh tarragon, about 8-10 large sprigs
Directions
  • Step 1 About an hour before cooking, remove the beef tenderloin from the refrigerator and place in a large roasting pan, which has been lightly sprayed with a cooking spray. Using paper towels, pat the tenderloin dry.
  • Step 2 Spread the olive oil over the entire tenderloin using your hands or a pastry brush. Cover the sides of the tenderloin with the kosher salt and black pepper, pressing gently into the meat.
  • Step 3 Tuck the “tail” (the thinner end of the tenderloin) under so that the meat is more uniform in size, allowing the meat to cook more evenly.
  • Step 4 Lay the springs of thyme across the top of the tenderloin. Using cooking twine, tie the tenderloin in about 4-5 places, securing tarragon as you go.
  • Step 5 Brush the top of the tarragon sprigs with remaining olive oil.
  • Step 6 Let the meat stand at room temperature at least 30 minutes, but no more than an hour. Preheat the oven to 275 degrees. Before placing the meat in the oven, insert a meat thermometer into the thickest part of the tenderloin.
  • Step 7 Roast for about 1-1/2 hours, or until the thermometer reaches 135 degrees for medium rare.
  • Step 8 Remove the tenderloin from the oven, cover with foil and let the meat rest about 20 minutes before carving. (Don’t skip the rest time… This allows the beef juices to settle back into the meat and keeps the meat moist.)


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