Sharing a seriously fun love for food

Category: Side Dishes

Pineapple Orange Bavarian

Pineapple Orange Bavarian

Gorgeous flavors of pineapple and orange are entwined together then folded into a cloud of whipped cream and mascarpone cheese. A delicate crunch from toasted walnuts completes this beautiful vintage salad!

Bavarians are classic salads that can double as a dessert. My Grandmother’s table always featured one. There as multiple variations, many took advantage of flavored gelatin which brought “fruit” flavors to life but many, including this version uses unflavored gelatin. This is a recipe lifted from the pages of one of her cookbooks published in the 1930s.

It starts with crushed pineapple, oranges and a touch of lemon suspended in the cold gelatin.

Then it’s gently folded into a luscious combination of whipped mascarpone and cream. Layer in a bit of nuttiness with a handful of golden walnuts plus more bites of orange.

This is perfect for entertaining because you can make this a day ahead. The Bavarian actually benefits from a bit of time to chill allowing the flavors to come together.

Creamy with subtle bites of pineapple and orange – it’s a delectable addition to your spring menu!

Pineapple Orange Bavarian

2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin, about 2-1/2 packets

½ cup water, room temperature

1 cup crushed pineapple, with juice, one 8-ounce can

1 cup orange juice

½ cup sugar

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

½ teaspoon orange extract

1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

1 cup heavy cream, whipped

½ cup mascarpone cheese

1 cup toasted chopped walnuts

1 large navel orange chopped into small pieces, about 1 cup

Mix the gelatin with the water to soften.

Place the crushed pineapple and the orange juice in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Add the softened gelatin along with the sugar, lemon juice, orange extract and kosher salt. Stir until the gelatin has dissolved completely.

Let cool then chill until set, about 2 to 3 hours.

In a medium mixing bowl, whip the cream on medium speed for about 2 minutes to thicken slightly. Add the mascarpone and continue beating until stiff peaks form.

Remove the pineapple orange gelatin from the fridge and stir with a wooden spoon to break up the gelatin into smaller pieces.

Gently fold the gelatin into the whipped cream. Add the walnuts and the chopped orange.

Spoon the Bavarian into a serving bowl and chill for about 2 to 3 hours to allow the flavors to meld together.

Serves 8.

Pineapple Orange Bavarian, courtesy of Preserving Good Stock

April 19, 2019
: Serves 8.

Gorgeous flavors of pineapple and orange are entwined together then folded into a cloud of whipped cream and mascarpone cheese. A delicate crunch from toasted walnuts completes this beautiful vintage salad!

By:

Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin, about 2-1/2 packets
  • ½ cup water, room temperature
  • 1 cup crushed pineapple, with juice, one 8-ounce can
  • 1 cup orange juice
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon orange extract
  • 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup heavy cream, whipped
  • ½ cup mascarpone cheese
  • 1 cup toasted chopped walnuts
  • 1 large navel orange chopped into small pieces, about 1 cup
Directions
  • Step 1 Mix the gelatin with the water to soften.
  • Step 2 Place the crushed pineapple and the orange juice in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat.
  • Step 3 Add the softened gelatin along with the sugar, lemon juice, orange extract and kosher salt. Stir until the gelatin has dissolved completely.
  • Step 4 Let cool then chill until set, about 2 to 3 hours.
  • Step 5 In a medium mixing bowl, whip the cream on medium speed for about 2 minutes to thicken slightly. Add the mascarpone and continue beating until stiff peaks form.
  • Step 6 Remove the pineapple orange gelatin from the fridge and stir with a wooden spoon to break up the gelatin into smaller pieces.
  • Step 7 Gently fold the gelatin into the whipped cream. Add the walnuts and the chopped orange.
  • Step 8 Spoon the Bavarian into a serving bowl and chill for about 2 to 3 hours to allow the flavors to meld together.
Deviled Eggs

Deviled Eggs

A creamy yellow, fluffy filling with just the right amount of tang from a dollop of Dijon mustard, piled high into the tender egg white shells. Finish by topping with an array of flavors and colors with a sprinkling of paprika. It’s a perfect plate for your Easter table!

Deviled eggs epitomize spring. They’re a family favorite and always remind me of Emily and my son-in-law Matthew. In classic Southern style they served them at their wedding reception and they were a spectacular addition.

It’s a simple dish but there are dozens and dozens of recipes for deviled eggs. This version comes from one of my “go to” cookbooks from Southern Living, “Secrets from the Southern Living Test Kitchens”. It has three of the classic ingredients – a luscious mayonnaise, a vibrant Dijon mustard and that familiar dusting of paprika.

But an unusual addition of potato flakes adds an extra “fluff” to the egg yolks creating a sturdy filling that’s really easy to pipe.

The egg yolk filling has the right balance of flavor that can support a multitude of toppings. Add smoked salmon, fresh dill, capers, sweet pickle relish, toasted walnuts and thin slices of scallion to turn that ordinary little deviled egg into something quite extraordinary.

The most difficult thing about making deviled eggs has to be peeling the eggs. It can be frustrating when half of the egg sticks to the shell. So I’ve gathered a few tips on hard-boiled eggs. Don’t use “farm fresh” eggs. Meaning, if you have hens in the backyard and you just gathered their eggs, the shells are more likely to stick to the egg when peeling.

After cooking, “shock” them in a bath of ice water. This quickly stops the eggs from cooking further and it’s also said to help with removing the shells.

When you’re ready to peel, gently tap to crack the shell all the way around. Then peel them under cold, running water. I always boil a few extra just in case you have one or two contrary eggs. You can sample the rejects or save them for egg salad!

Whether spooning the filling or piping it in, mixing in the pickle relish or placing it on top – it’s hard to find anyone who doesn’t love a deviled egg!

Deviled Eggs

12 extra-large eggs, room temperature

¾ cup good mayonnaise, such as Duke’s

1 tablespoon good Dijon mustard, such as Maille

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

½ cup potato flakes

Garnish: capers, sweet pickle relish, fresh dill, smoked salmon, scallions, toasted chopped walnuts and smoked paprika

For the hard-boiled eggs:

Place the eggs in a saucepan large enough to keep them in a single layer. Cover the eggs with water, and about 1” over the tops.

Place the saucepan over medium heat. As soon as the water begins to boil remove the pan from the heat and cover with a lid. Leave the eggs in the pan for 12 minutes. After the 12 minutes pour out the hot water and add ice water to quickly cool the eggs and stop them from cooking further.

For the deviled eggs:

Peel the eggs then slice them in half lengthwise. Carefully remove the yolks and place them in a mixing bowl. Transfer the egg whites to a rimmed sheet pan and refrigerate while you make the filling.

Add the mayonnaise along with the mustard to the egg yolks. Toss in the kosher salt, the black pepper and the potato flakes.

Using an immersion blender whip until the egg yolk mixture is smooth. You can also cream the egg yolks in a food processor.

Pipe or spoon the egg yolk filling into the cavity of the egg white, about 2 tablespoons per egg white.

Top with your favorite garnish and dust with a sprinkling of smoked paprika.

If you’re not planning on piping the filling you can mash the yolks with a fork then fold in the other ingredients. Then spoon the filling into the egg whites.

Makes 24 deviled eggs.

Deviled Eggs, courtesy of Preserving Good Stock

April 17, 2019
: Makes 24 deviled eggs.

A creamy yellow fluffy filling with just the right amount of tang from a dollop of Dijon mustard - piled high into the tender egg white shells. Finish by topping with an array of flavors and colors with a sprinkling of paprika.

By:

Ingredients
  • 12 extra-large eggs, room temperature
  • ¾ cup good mayonnaise, such as Duke’s
  • 1 tablespoon good Dijon mustard, such as Maille
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • ½ cup potato flakes
  • Garnish: capers, sweet pickle relish, fresh dill, smoked salmon, scallions, toasted chopped walnuts and smoked paprika
Directions
  • Step 1 For the hard-boiled eggs:
  • Step 2 Place the eggs in a saucepan large enough to keep them in a single layer. Cover the eggs with water, and about 1” over the tops. Place the saucepan over medium heat.
  • Step 3 As soon as the water begins to boil remove the pan from the heat and cover with a lid. Leave the eggs in the pan for 12 minutes.
  • Step 4 After the 12 minutes pour out the hot water and add ice water to quickly cool the eggs and stop them from cooking further.
  • Step 5 For the deviled eggs:
  • Step 6 Peel the eggs then slice them in half lengthwise. Carefully remove the yolks and place them in a mixing bowl. Transfer the egg whites to a rimmed sheet pan and refrigerate while you make the filling.
  • Step 7 Add the mayonnaise along with the mustard to the egg yolks. Toss in the kosher salt, the black pepper and the potato flakes.
  • Step 8 Using an immersion blender whip until the egg yolk mixture is smooth. You can also cream the egg yolks in a food processor.
  • Step 9 Pipe or spoon the egg yolk filling into the cavity of the egg white, about 2 tablespoons per egg white.
  • Step 10 Top with your favorite garnish and dust with a sprinkling of smoked paprika.
  • Step 11 If you’re not planning on piping the filling you can mash the yolks with a fork then fold in the other ingredients. Then spoon the filling into the egg whites.
Roasted Asparagus with Herb Vinaigrette

Roasted Asparagus with Herb Vinaigrette

Asparagus roasted just until it’s tender crisp then dressed with notes of parsley and tarragon in a luscious vinaigrette. Added tang from lemon and capers then topped with chopped hard-boiled eggs – this chilled side is as beautiful to the eye as it is to the palate!

This is an updated version of a dish my Mom made. One big improvement is the roasted asparagus. Many older recipes used canned asparagus – not nearly as appealing as fresh asparagus.

It’s a great side for entertaining. The vinaigrette is full of bright spring flavors from parsley, tarragon, scallions, lemons and capers. Blended together in a wonderful olive oil and champagne vinegar, the flavors continue to meld together so making it ahead is a plus.

Roast the asparagus with a simple toss of olive oil, a sprinkling of kosher salt and a dash or two of freshly cracked pepper.

It’s a side, it’s a salad and it can be served well chilled or at room temperature. And it’s always dazzling and delicious!

Roasted Asparagus with Herb Vinaigrette

1 teaspoon dry mustard

1 teaspoon garlic salt

1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper, divided

Zest of 1 lemon, about 1 teaspoon

2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley

2 tablespoons fresh chopped tarragon

2 tablespoons thinly sliced scallion, about 1 scallion

1 tablespoon capers, plus extra for garnish

10 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided

3 tablespoon champagne or white wine vinegar

2 bunches fresh asparagus, about 2 pounds

1 teaspoon kosher salt

2 teaspoons lemon juice, about ½ lemon

2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped

For the herb vinaigrette:

Combine the dry mustard with the garlic salt and ½ teaspoon of the black pepper.

Add the lemon zest, parsley, tarragon, scallions and capers.

Whisk in 6 tablespoons of the olive oil and the champagne vinegar. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour.

For the roasted asparagus:

Snap the tough ends off the bottom of the asparagus. Rinse and pat dry.

Spread the asparagus out in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. (Lining the baking sheet with heavy-duty foil makes for easy cleanup.) Drizzle the remaining olive oil over the asparagus, toss to coat well.

Sprinkle with the kosher salt and remaining ½ teaspoon black pepper. Roast in a 400-degree oven for 15 minutes or if the stalks are thin, roast for about 10 minutes – just until the tip of a sharp knife easily pierces the stem.

Cool or chill.

For serving:

Arrange the roasted asparagus on a platter. Squeeze the juice from half of a lemon over the asparagus. Top with the chopped hard-boiled eggs.

Drizzle the herb vinaigrette over the asparagus and sprinkle about the remaining capers over the top.

Serve chilled or at room temperature.

Serves 8.

Roasted Asparagus with Herb Vinaigrette, courtesy of Preserving Good Stock

April 5, 2019
: Serves 8.

Asparagus, roasted just until it’s tender crisp then dressed with notes of parsley and tarragon in a luscious vinaigrette. Added tang from lemon and capers, this chilled side - topped with chopped hard-boiled eggs – is as beautiful to the eye as it is to the palate!

By:

Ingredients
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1 teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper, divided
  • Zest of 1 lemon, about 1 teaspoon
  • 2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley
  • 2 tablespoons fresh chopped tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons thinly sliced scallion, about 1 scallion
  • 1 tablespoon capers, plus extra for garnish
  • 10 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 3 tablespoon champagne or white wine vinegar
  • 2 bunches fresh asparagus, about 2 pounds
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice, about ½ lemon
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped
Directions
  • Step 1 For the herb vinaigrette:
  • Step 2 Combine the dry mustard with the garlic salt and ½ teaspoon of the black pepper.
  • Step 3 Add the lemon zest, parsley, tarragon, scallions and capers.
  • Step 4 Whisk in 6 tablespoons of the olive oil and the champagne vinegar. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour.
  • Step 5 For the roasted asparagus:
  • Step 6 Snap the tough ends off the bottom of the asparagus. Rinse and pat dry.
  • Step 7 Spread the asparagus out in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. (Lining the baking sheet with heavy-duty foil makes for easy cleanup.)
  • Step 8 Drizzle the remaining olive oil over the asparagus, toss to coat well.
  • Step 9 Sprinkle with the kosher salt and remaining ½ teaspoon black pepper.
  • Step 10 Roast in a 400-degree oven for 15 minutes or if the stalks are thin, roast for about 10 minutes – just until the tip of a sharp knife easily pierces the stem.
  • Step 11 Cool or chill.
  • Step 12 For serving:
  • Step 13 Arrange the roasted asparagus on a platter. Squeeze the juice from half of a lemon over the asparagus.
  • Step 14 Top with the chopped hard-boiled eggs.
  • Step 15 Drizzle the herb vinaigrette over the asparagus and sprinkle about the remaining capers over the top.
  • Step 16 Serve chilled or at room temperature.
Orange Braised Carrots

Orange Braised Carrots

This is a perfect dish to brighten up your day – tender carrots braised in a divine orange sauce with the right touch of ground cinnamon and freshly grated nutmeg!

Carrots are one of our favorite vegetables and the addition of orange is a great way to highlight their gorgeous flavor. Swirl a bit of dark brown sugar along with cinnamon and nutmeg into butter, fresh orange zest and the juice of sweet, plump oranges.

We’re no longer limited to the basic orange variety of carrots stuffed into a plastic bag. Colorful carrots with their spectacular foliage still intact are widely available in food markets. They are commonly mixed and bundled together with each offering a subtle difference in their flavor profile. So don’t be afraid to serve a rainbow of color and taste!

If you are lucky enough to find these lovely gems look for foliage that’s full of color and carrots that are firm, with no signs of shriveling. If the green leafy tops are still attached to the carrots you’ll want to trim them off once you get them home, or shortly after. The tops will continue to pull moisture and nutrients from the carrots, not a good thing.

These carrots are often smaller than their packaged counterparts so cooking time is a bit quicker. And no need to use a vegetable peeler, a quick scrub with a vegetable brush is really all that is needed to prep this colorful root vegetable.

If you want to get a jump on meal prep you can cook the carrots for about 20 minutes and leave them in the braising liquid, cool and pop them in the refrigerator. Then when you’re ready just heat until the carrots are tender when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife.

A delicious side dish to start the week and bounce back from that lost hour of sleep!

Orange Braised Carrots

3 large navel oranges

3 tablespoons butter

1/3 cup dark brown sugar

¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

12 to 16 small carrots, scrubbed and ends trimmed

Zest 1 of the oranges and then juice it along with one of the other oranges. You should have about 1 teaspoon orange zest and about 1 cup orange juice. Slice the remaining orange.

Melt the butter in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the brown sugar along with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour the orange juice into the pan and cook until the brown sugar has melted, about 5 minutes. Stir in the orange zest.

Toss in the carrots stirring to coat them in the orange braising liquid.

Place the slices of orange over the top of the carrots. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cover the pan. Cook the carrots for about 30 to 35 minutes, spooning the braising liquid over the carrots about every 10 to 15 minutes. Continue cooking until the carrots are tender when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

Orange Braised Carrots, courtesy of Preserving Good Stock

March 11, 2019
: Serves 4 to 6.

Tender carrots braised in a divine orange sauce with the right touch of cinnamon and freshly grated nutmeg!

By:

Ingredients
  • 3 large navel oranges
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1/3 cup dark brown sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 12 to 16 small carrots, scrubbed and ends trimmed
Directions
  • Step 1 Zest 1 of the oranges and then juice it along with one of the other oranges. You should have about 1 teaspoon orange zest and about 1 cup orange juice. Slice the remaining orange.
  • Step 2 Melt the butter in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the brown sugar along with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour the orange juice into the pan and cook until the brown sugar has melted, about 5 minutes. Stir in the orange zest.
  • Step 3 Toss in the carrots stirring to coat them in the orange braising liquid.
  • Step 4 Place the slices of orange over the top of the carrots. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cover the pan. Cook the carrots for about 30 to 35 minutes, spooning the braising liquid over the carrots about every 10 to 15 minutes. Continue cooking until the carrots are tender when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife.
Kale and Orange Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette

Kale and Orange Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette

A beautiful contrast between the clean, brightness of lemon and the gentle sweetness of fresh orange brings a simple kale salad to life. Toss with Parmesan cheese and toasted pecans and simple becomes quite delicious!

Kale is a sturdy green that has been grown in gardens for thousands of years, first appearing in this country in the 1600s. Kale is more common now than in recent years but there are still a lot of naysayers when it comes to this gorgeous green. I love using this green in juices – it’s loaded with vitamin C, calcium and fiber and according to the American Kale Association kale was considered a super food during World War II. The balance of flavors in this salad  are quite basic – kale, lemon, orange, Parmesan, pecans, garlic and rich olive oil – but the results are really wonderful!

Kale’s tough leaves and stems can be a challenge. As with any hearty green you need to wash the leaves thoroughly. Start by placing the leaves in cold water, swish them around to loosen any grit in the leaves or on the stems. Then rinse and repeat until the water is clear and there is no sign of grit on the kale – about 2 to 3 times.

Roll up the leaves out in an absorbent towel and let the greens dry. You don’t want any moisture trapped in the leaves to water down your vinaigrette. You can wash the kale 2 to 3 days in advance and refrigerate.

Next tackle the stem, which is really quite easy. Lay the leaf out flat with the stem side up or fold the leaf in half and cut the stem away. Or simply grab hold of the stem in one hand and the leaf in the other and pull the stem from the leaf.

Next you need to tenderize the leaves. There are two ways. One is to “massage” the leaves. Emily found a great way to tackle this task. She drops the leaves into the bowl of her KitchenAid mixer and lets the beaters do the work. Beat until the leaves looked as though they’ve been sautéed. The second is to chop the leaves into very, very fine pieces – almost mincing them.

Kale has an slightly peppery note that plays well with both tangy and subtly sweet notes. Light and refreshing – this kale salad is perfect for a midwinter break!

Kale and Orange Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette

For the salad:

1 bunch curly kale, about 10 to 12 ounces

¼ cup chopped toasted pecans

1 large Cara Cara or navel orange, peeled, sectioned and cut into bite-size pieces

¼ cup shredded Parmesan cheese plus extra for serving

For the lemon vinaigrette:

Zest from one small lemon, about ½ teaspoon

3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice, about 1 small lemon

¾ to 1 teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

½ teaspoon minced garlic

5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Remove the stem from the back of the kale leaves. Finely chop the kale leaves – almost mincing them. You want 4 cups of chopped greens.

Toss the kale leaves into a large serving bowl along with the orange, the toasted pecans and the Parmesan cheese.

Place the lemon zest and the lemon juice along with the ¾ teaspoon of the kosher salt, pepper and the garlic into a small food processer or blender.

Add the olive oil and process until the vinaigrette is smooth and blended together. Check for seasoning and add the additional ¼ teaspoon kosher salt if desired.

Pour the vinaigrette over the kale salad and toss to fully coat.

Top with an extra sprinkling of Parmesan cheese.

This salad keeps for a day or two in your fridge even with the dressing. Serves 4.

Kale and Orange Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette, courtesy of Preserving Good Stock

February 4, 2019
: Serves 4.

A beautiful contrast between the clean, brightness of lemon and the gentle sweetness of fresh orange brings a simple kale salad to life. Toss with Parmesan cheese and toasted pecans simple becomes quite delicious!

By:

Ingredients
  • For the salad:
  • 1 bunch curly kale, about 10 to 12 ounces
  • ¼ cup chopped toasted pecans
  • 1 large Cara Cara or navel orange, peeled, sectioned and cut into bite-size pieces
  • ¼ cup shredded Parmesan cheese plus extra for serving
  • For the lemon vinaigrette:
  • Zest from one small lemon, about ½ teaspoon
  • 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice, about 1 small lemon
  • ¾ to 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon minced garlic
  • 5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Directions
  • Step 1 Remove the stem from the back of the kale leaves. Finely chop the kale leaves – almost mincing them. You want 4 cups of chopped greens.
  • Step 2 Toss the kale leaves into a large serving bowl along with the orange, the toasted pecans and the Parmesan cheese.
  • Step 3 Place the lemon zest and the lemon juice along with the ¾ teaspoon of the kosher salt, pepper and the garlic into a small food processer or blender. Add the olive oil and process until the vinaigrette is smooth and blended together. Check for seasoning and add the additional ¼ teaspoon kosher salt if desired.
  • Step 4 Pour the vinaigrette over the kale salad and toss to fully coat.
  • Step 5 Top with an extra sprinkling of Parmesan cheese.
  • Step 6 This salad keeps for a day or two in your fridge even with the dressing.
Roasted Beet and Orange Salad with Orange Vinaigrette

Roasted Beet and Orange Salad with Orange Vinaigrette

This is a breath of brightness and beauty in the middle of winter – roasted beets served with juicy oranges and piquant red onions perched atop peppery arugula and fresh greens.

One of my many favorite things in popping in for a visit with Emily and Matthew is the discovery of new recipes on their menu. Our last trip was no exception! Emily served this gorgeous salad along with a succulent beef tenderloin for the holidays. I knew immediately this would be added to my files.

Anything with roasted beets is a yes for me. We grew up eating beets, pulling them out of the ground from my Grandmother’s enormous garden. She would can jars of those deep red beauties storing them in her root cellar for the harsh Panhandle winter months. For years fresh beets were difficult to find in the markets but now, luckily they are frequently available.

The roasted beets for this salad are paired with slices of sweet oranges and thinly sliced red onions. Luscious goat cheese is whisked into an orange juice reduction creating a creamy citrus vinaigrette. You can use your favorite mixed greens for this salad – the arugula adds a peppery bite.

But don’t be quick to toss those beet greens!. Chop them along with some of those deep crimson stems for the salad and save any extra for your favorite juice blend. (We use them in our Beet and Apple Juice.) Make sure you wash the beet greens and stems really well to remove any dirt or sand that tends to cling to them.

You can roast the beets and make the vinaigrette a day or two in advance making the prep easier.

A wonderful salad full of flavor and color – perfect for any season!

Roasted Beet and Orange Salad with Orange Vinaigrette

2 bunches of beets, about 7- 8 medium size with greens if available

2 tablespoons olive oil, divided

1 teaspoons kosher salt, divided

½ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

2 large navel oranges

4 cups arugula

2 cups mixed greens or beet greens and stems, rinsed well and chopped

½ small red onion, sliced very thin

½ cup toasted walnuts

For the orange vinaigrette:

¾ cup orange juice plus 2 tablespoons, divided

1-1/2 teaspoons sugar

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 package honey goat cheese, 4-ounces at room temperature plus extra for serving

1 tablespoon heavy cream

½ teaspoon kosher salt, plus extra for finishing the salad

1/8 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper, plus extra for finishing the salad

2 tablespoon champagne vinegar

1-1/2 tablespoons aged balsamic vinegar

To roast the beets:

Trim the tops and roots off the beets, peel and cut into quarters.

Reserve the beet greens and stems if you’re using them for the salad. (Quick tip: wear food service gloves to prevent your hands from getting stained from the beet juice.) Toss the beets with the 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and spread out in a single layer on a baking sheet. For easy cleanup line the baking sheet with foil. Sprinkle with 1 teaspoon kosher salt and ¼ teaspoon black pepper. Roast the beets at 400-degrees for 40 to 45 minutes, stirring about every 15 minutes. Cook until the beets are cooked through and very tender when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife.

The beets can be roasted in advance and refrigerated until you’re ready to make the salad.

To make the dressing:

Combine ¾ cup of the orange juice and the sugar in a small saucepan.

Place the pan over medium heat and simmer for about 30 to 40 minutes or until the juice is reduced down to about 3 tablespoons, stirring occasionally.

Let the juice cool then add the olive oil, the 4-ounce package of softened goat cheese and the cream, whisking until the goat cheese is smooth and blended well.

Whisk in the kosher salt and pepper with both the champagne and balsamic vinegar.

The dressing can be made in advance and refrigerated until you make the salad. Let it warm to room temperature for full flavor.

To assemble the salad:

On individual salad plates, add a handful of arugula and the mixed greens, dividing between plates then layer in the sliced red onion.

Add slices of the oranges then top with the roasted beets.

Top with toasted walnuts and additional crumbled goat cheese. Drizzle with the orange vinaigrette then sprinkle with a pinch of kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper to taste.

Makes 4 servings.

Roasted Beet and Orange Salad with Orange Vinaigrette

January 9, 2019
: Makes 4 servings.

This is a breath of brightness and beauty – roasted beets served with juicy oranges and piquant red onions perched atop peppery arugula and fresh greens.

By:

Ingredients
  • For the salad:
  • 2 bunches of beets, about 7- 8 medium size with greens if available
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
  • ½ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 2 large navel oranges
  • 4 cups arugula
  • 2 cups mixed greens or beet greens and stems, rinsed well and chopped
  • ½ small red onion, sliced very thin
  • ½ cup toasted walnuts
  • For the orange vinaigrette:
  • ¾ cup orange juice plus 2 tablespoons, divided
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 package honey goat cheese, 4-ounces at room temperature plus extra for serving
  • 1 tablespoon heavy cream
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt, plus extra for finishing the salad
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper, plus extra for finishing the salad
  • 2 tablespoon champagne vinegar
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons aged balsamic vinegar
Directions
  • Step 1 To roast the beets:
  • Step 2 Trim the tops and roots off the beets, peel and cut into quarters. Reserve the beet greens and stems if you’re using them for the salad. (Quick tip: wear food service gloves to prevent your hands from getting stained from the beet juice.)
  • Step 3 Toss the beets with the 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and spread out in a single layer on a baking sheet. For easy cleanup line the baking sheet with foil. Sprinkle with 1 teaspoon kosher salt and ¼ teaspoon black pepper.
  • Step 4 Roast the beets at 400-degrees for 40 to 45 minutes, stirring about every 15 minutes. Cook until the beets are cooked through and very tender when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife.
  • Step 5 The beets can be roasted in advance and refrigerated until you’re ready to make the salad.
  • Step 6 Make the dressing:
  • Step 7 Combine ¾ cup of the orange juice and the sugar in a small saucepan. Place the pan over medium heat and simmer for about 30 to 40 minutes or until the juice is reduced down to about 3 tablespoons, stirring occasionally.
  • Step 8 Let the juice cool then add the olive oil, the 4-ounce package of softened goat cheese and the cream, whisking until the goat cheese is smooth and blended well.
  • Step 9 Whisk in the kosher salt and pepper with both the champagne and balsamic vinegar.
  • Step 10 The dressing can be made in advance and refrigerated until you make the salad. Let it warm to room temperature for full flavor.
  • Step 11 To assemble the salad:
  • Step 12 On individual salad plates, add a handful of arugula and the mixed greens, dividing between plates.
  • Step 13 Layer in the sliced red onion and pieces of the oranges then top with the roasted beets.
  • Step 14 Add the toasted walnuts and additional crumbled goat cheese. Drizzle with the orange vinaigrette then sprinkle with a pinch of kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper to taste.
Orange and Maple Scented Brussels Sprouts

Orange and Maple Scented Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts just might be the most hated, though often never tried, misunderstood vegetable there is.

But things change when you take sprouts, toss them with olive oil and orange zest then gently sear them until they begin to caramelize. Add a splash of orange juice and a quick roast before finishing with subtle notes of sweet maple and a tang of balsamic vinegar. These miniature members of the cabbage family take on a bright yet smoky, slightly rich nutty edge.

When shopping for Brussels sprouts look for sprouts with a true green color and fresh, tight leaves. You can find these gems throughout the year but they are in peak season from September to February.

Toss in some great pantry basics – olive oil, kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper. Then add the zest of one orange to brighten the flavor.

Caramelize the cut edges then pour in freshly squeezed orange juice. Roast until just tender and balance out the bite with balsamic vinegar and pure maple syrup.

Be brave, give Brussels sprouts a try – with these remarkable flavors they might become your new favorite vegetable!

Orange and Maple Scented Brussels Sprouts

1-1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts, rinsed and ends trimmed, about 24 large sprouts

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon kosher salt

¼ to ½ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

Zest of 1 large orange, about ½ teaspoon

Juice of 1 large orange, about ½ cup

1 tablespoon aged balsamic vinegar

3 tablespoons pure maple syrup

Preheat the oven to 450-degrees. Toss the Brussels sprouts in a large bowl with the olive oil, kosher salt, black pepper and orange zest.

Lightly spray a large skillet with cooking spray and set it over medium heat. When the pan is hot place the sprouts cut side down in the pan. Cook the sprouts for about 8 to 10 minutes or until the cut side of the sprouts begin to turn golden in color.

Pour the orange juice into the pan and gently toss to coat.

Roast the sprouts in a 450-degree oven for 10 minutes or until the sprouts are just beginning to become tender. Lower the heat to 300-degrees. Stir in the balsamic vinegar and the maple syrup and cook for an additional 5 to 10 minutes until the sprouts are tender.

Orange and Maple Scented Brussels Sprouts, courtesy of Preserving Good Stock

October 3, 2018
: 4 to 6

With a splash of citrus and a light glaze of maple these miniature members of the cabbage family take on a bright yet smoky, slightly rich nutty edge.

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Ingredients
  • 1-1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts, rinsed and ends trimmed, about 24 large sprouts
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • Zest of 1 large orange, about 1/2 teaspoon
  • Juice of 1 large orange, about 1/2 cup
  • 1 tablespoon aged balsamic vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup
Directions
  • Step 1 Preheat the oven to 450-degrees.
  • Step 2 Toss the Brussels sprouts in a large bowl with the olive oil, kosher salt, black pepper and orange zest.
  • Step 3 Lightly spray a large skillet with cooking spray and set it over medium heat. When the pan is hot place the sprouts cut side down in the pan. Cook the sprouts for about 8 to 10 minutes or until the cut side of the sprouts begin to turn golden in color.
  • Step 4 Pour the orange juice into the pan and gently toss to coat. Roast the sprouts in a 450-degree oven for 10 minutes or until the sprouts are just beginning to become tender.
  • Step 5 Lower the heat to 300-degrees. Stir in the balsamic vinegar and the maple syrup. Cook for an additional 5 to 10 minutes, or until the sprouts are tender.
Southern Fried Okra

Southern Fried Okra

There’s no way one can buy just a little okra when you are lucky enough to find gorgeous, fresh okra. And if you have fresh okra, well you have to make fried okra!

Fried okra is another Southern staple. Okra, dusted with cornmeal and flour simply seasoned with kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper. Nothing complicated but everything wonderful.

This is a simple dish with one trick before you start. Soak the sliced okra in cold water. Soaking sliced okra in cold water for about 5 minutes helps to reduce that peculiar sliminess that is inherit to okra. From there, drain it then dust it in the cornmeal and flour before a quick fry to crispy goodness!

About slicing – both my Grandmothers sliced okra crosswise into bite size pieces, about ½” each when frying. But having spent much time with Emily and Matthew in many wonderful dining spots in Atlanta, I’ve seen this Southern treat sliced and served lengthwise.

And the beauty of this version, not only does it keep that unique pod shape, it’s also a perfect finger food, fit to serve as an appetizer. Add a side of ranch or blue cheese dressing for dipping and it’s hard to beat!

No matter how you slice it – fried okra is a classic Southern treat and for good reason!

Southern Fried Okra

1 pound fresh okra pods

2 cups cornmeal

1 cup flour

2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus extra for seasoning the cooked okra

1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

2 to 4 cups vegetable oil for frying –the amount depends upon the size pan you use for frying

Before you start: It’s helpful to have a thermometer clipped to the side of the pan to keep an eye on the heat of the oil.

Slice the fresh okra pods lengthwise or crosswise. Place the cut okra in a large bowl and cover with cold water; soak for 5 minutes. Drain the okra in a sieve or colander.

In a large bowl whisk together the cornmeal, flour, 2 teaspoons of kosher salt and the pepper.

Using a deep skillet or medium saucepan, pour in enough oil until it’s about 1/3 of the way up the side. Don’t overfill or the oil will overflow when you add the okra. Heat the oil over medium to medium-high heat until the temperature reaches 375-degrees.

Grab one or two handfuls of the sliced okra and toss in the cornmeal and flour mixture, coating to cover all sides of the okra.

Slowly lower the coated okra into the hot oil – don’t crowd the pan. Cook until the okra is golden brown, about 5 minutes. Using a spider or slotted spoon transfer the cooked okra to an ovenproof dish that is lined with paper towels. Sprinkle with additional kosher salt. Keep warm in a 200-degree oven while you continue cooking the remaining okra.

The temperature of the cooking oil will drop below 375-degrees after frying a batch of okra – just let the oil come back to temperature before frying anymore.

Serve as a side dish or as an appetizer with ranch or blue cheese dressing for dipping.

Southern Fried Okra, courtesy of Preserving Good Stock

August 27, 2018
: 6 to 8

Fried okra is a Southern staple. Okra, dusted with cornmeal and flour simply seasoned with kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper. Nothing complicated but everything wonderful.

By:

Ingredients
  • 1 pound fresh okra pods
  • 2 cups cornmeal
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus extra for seasoning the cooked okra
  • 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 2 to 4 cups vegetable oil for frying –the amount depends upon the size pan you use for frying
Directions
  • Step 1 Before you start: It’s helpful to have a thermometer clipped to the side of the pan to keep an eye on the heat of the oil.
  • Step 2 Slice the fresh okra pods lengthwise or crosswise. Place the cut okra in a large bowl and cover with cold water
  • Step 3 soak for 5 minutes. Drain the okra in a sieve or colander.
  • Step 4 In a large bowl whisk together the cornmeal, flour, 2 teaspoons of kosher salt and the pepper.
  • Step 5 Using a deep skillet or medium saucepan, pour in enough oil until it’s about 1/3 of the way up the side. Don’t overfill or the oil will overflow when you add the okra.
  • Step 6 Heat the oil over medium to medium-high heat until the temperature reaches 375-degrees.
  • Step 7 Grab one or two handfuls of the sliced okra and toss in the cornmeal and flour mixture, coating to cover all sides of the okra.
  • Step 8 Slowly lower the coated okra into the hot oil – don’t crowd the pan. Cook until the okra is golden brown, about 5 minutes. Using a spider or slotted spoon transfer the cooked okra to an ovenproof dish that is lined with paper towels. Sprinkle with additional kosher salt.
  • Step 9 Keep warm in a 200-degree oven while you continue cooking the remaining okra.
  • Step 10 The temperature of the cooking oil will drop below 375-degrees after frying a batch of okra – just let the oil come back to temperature before frying anymore.
  • Step 11 Serve as a side dish or as an appetizer with ranch or blue cheese dressing for dipping.
Stewed Summer Squash

Stewed Summer Squash

There’s something that feels somewhat Southern and comforting about stewed summer squash. It’s a simple dish with delicate flavors – and with each bite it captures everything wonderful about this sunny yellow vegetable.

Summer squash reminds me of my Grandmother, Tassie Mae. Every summer both my grandmothers raised this gorgeous yellow crookneck squash but Tassie Mae grew bushel baskets of this tender vegetable. The first time I planted this common member of the gourd family I had no idea how prolific this plant could be. I gave squash to friends and family then packed a freezer full of this yellow beauty.

This is one of the simplest ways to prepare summer squash. Sautéed sweet onion with slices of yellow squash, simmered in stock then finished with a touch of cream.

It’s an easy recipe and can be made several days in advance. And though you seldom find produce sold in bushel baskets, grab enough for now and freeze some summer for later!

Stewed Summer Squash

4 tablespoons butter

1 large sweet onion, sliced thin – about 2-1/2 cups

2 pounds yellow summer squash, sliced about ¼” thick

1-1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, or to taste

1 teaspoon sugar

¾ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper, or to taste

1 cup chicken or vegetable stock

¼ cup cream

Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Toss in the sliced onions and cook until tender, translucent and cooked down, about 15 minutes.

Add the sliced squash along with the kosher salt, sugar, black pepper and stock.

Cover the saucepan and continue cooking over medium heat for about 15 to 20 minutes or until the squash is tender.

Drain the liquid from the squash.

Return the pan to the heat, stir in the cream and cook for a few minutes just to warm through.

Stewed Summer Squash, courtesy of Preserving Good Stock

August 20, 2018
: 6 to 8

This is one of the simplest ways to prepare summer squash. Sautéed sweet onion with slices of yellow squash simmered in stock then finished with a touch of cream.

By:

Ingredients
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1 large sweet onion, sliced thin – about 2-1/2 cups
  • 2 pounds yellow summer squash, sliced about ¼” thick
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ¾ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper, or to taste
  • 1 cup chicken or vegetable stock
  • ¼ cup cream
Directions
  • Step 1 Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat.
  • Step 2 Toss in the sliced onions and cook until tender, translucent and cooked down, about 15 minutes.
  • Step 3 Add the sliced squash along with the kosher salt, sugar, black pepper and stock. Cover the saucepan and continue cooking over medium heat for about 15 to 20 minutes or until the squash is tender.
  • Step 4 Drain the liquid from the squash.
  • Step 5 Return the pan to the heat, stir in the cream and cook for a few minutes just to warm through.
Vichyssoise

Vichyssoise

Vichyssoise – a rich, creamy potato and leek soup – is a delicious switch from the traditional potato soup served hot. This is one soup you won’t mind getting cold.

There are disputes about the true birthplace of vichyssoise. Some claim the roots of this luscious soup belong to France, some say the United States. But many credit a French chef from the Ritz-Carlton in New York who is said to have created and served this luscious soup well chilled in the early 1900s. Regardless of the origin this classic it is worthy of adding to your recipe file.

Start with savory ingredients – sweet onion and leeks – that are sautéed in butter until tender. Add Yukon gold potatoes along with chicken stock and simmer before being pureeing into a velvety smooth base. Finish with milk and cream, chill until cold and you have one delectable soup!

Leeks are a must to capture the delicate flavor of this soup. Related to onions – leeks are technically members of the amaryllis family. The dark green leaves are tough but can be used when you’re making a stock. But for this soup only toss in the white and the very light green part of the leek. You want the vichyssoise to be almost white in color, which is also the reason white pepper is used.

For the potatoes, one of my favorites is the Yukon gold. Its slightly nutty, buttery flavor and smooth texture lends the right touch.

The potatoes, onions and leeks can be pureed in a blender but I’ve never been a fan of transferring hot liquids back and forth from a steaming stockpot to a blender and back again. My preference is an immersion blender – it works beautifully. I’ve had several through the years and my favorite is from All-Clad. Powerful, with an extended wand, it’s perfect for large or small batches. As with any immersion blender, just make sure to keep the blade submerged or you’ll spray your kitchen!

Versatile, this soup can be served as an appetizer, a side or your main entrée. And yes, you can also dish it up hot but if you’ve never tried it chilled you owe it to yourself to try it– at least once!

Vichyssoise

4 tablespoons butter

4 leeks*, about 3 pounds, mainly the white part – chopped

1 medium onion, chopped – about 1-1/2 cups

4 pounds Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and sliced thin

4 to 6 cups chicken stock

1 teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste

½ teaspoon white pepper, or to taste

1 cup milk

1 cup cream

Fresh chives, chopped for garnish

Melt the butter in a large stockpot over medium heat. Add the chopped leeks and onions.

Cook until both are tender and translucent, but not browned – about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the sliced potatoes along with 4 cups of the stock – add the additional 2 cups only if needed to almost cover the potatoes.

Cover the stockpot and cook over medium heat for about 30 minutes or until the potatoes are tender.

If you added 6 cups of stock, strain off 2 cups before pureeing. You can reserve this stock and add it later if you want a thinner consistency for the soup. Remove the soup from the heat and using an immersion blender, puree the mixture until it is very, very smooth.

Season the soup with the kosher salt and white pepper then stir in the milk and cream.

Refrigerate the soup until it is well chilled. Top with fresh chives for serving.

*Cleaning leeks is an important step. As the leaves push up through the ground they capture a lot of dirt along the way. To clean, cut the dark green leaves down to the light green part of the leek.

Then cut an “X” about 3” to 4” from the leaves down towards the bulb.

Place the leeks cut side down in a large measuring cup or bowl filled with cold water. Let them soak for about 20 minutes to let the leeks open up a bit. Rinse the leeks under cold running water to make sure all the dirt is removed.

Vichyssoise, courtesy of Preserving Good Stock

August 17, 2018
: 6 to 8

Vichyssoise - a rich, creamy potato and leek soup - is a delicious switch from the classic potato soup served hot. This is one soup you won’t mind getting cold.

By:

Ingredients
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 4 leeks*, about 3 pounds, mainly the white part - chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped – about 1-1/2 cups
  • 4 pounds Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and sliced thin
  • 4 to 6 cups chicken stock
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste
  • ½ teaspoon white pepper, or to taste
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup cream
  • Fresh chives, chopped for garnish
Directions
  • Step 1 Melt the butter in a large stockpot over medium heat. Add the chopped leeks and onions and cook until both are tender and translucent, but not browned – about 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Step 2 Add the sliced potatoes along with 4 cups of the stock – add the additional 2 cups if needed to almost cover the potatoes. Cover the stockpot and cook over medium heat for about 30 minutes or until the potatoes are tender.
  • Step 3 If you added 6 cups of stock, strain off 2 cups. You can reserve this stock and add it later if you want a thinner consistency for the soup.
  • Step 4 Remove the soup from the heat and using an immersion blender, puree the mixture until it is very, very smooth.
  • Step 5 Season the soup with the kosher salt and white pepper then stir in the milk and cream.
  • Step 6 Refrigerate the soup until it is well chilled.
  • Step 7 Top with fresh chives for serving.
  • Step 8 *Cleaning leeks is an important step. As the leaves push up through the ground they capture a lot of dirt along the way. To clean, cut the dark green leaves down to the light green part of the leek. Then cut an “X” about 3” to 4” from the leaves down towards the bulb. Place the leeks cut side down in a large measuring cup or bowl filled with cold water. Let them soak for about 20 minutes to let the leeks open up a bit. Rinse the leeks under cold running water to make sure all the dirt is removed.